WELCOME TO CATALOGUE 58A
JAPAN AND ASIA

 

 

 

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1.[AVANT GARDE] Tamamura Zennosuke, Nogawa Takeshi, et al. EPOKKU EPOCK V BANKIN KEIKÔ GEIJUTSU EXPRESSIONISM CUBISM IMAGINISM FUTURISM Epokku-sha, Tôkyô, Taishô 12 [1923] 24.1 x 16.5 cm, bound in illustrated wrappers, Western-style. The brothers Nogawa, Ryû and Hajime, were closely involved in the creation of this art and poetry journal. This 5th issue, dedicated to the art movements at that point in full flood in Japan, represented the last issue of EPOCH. It would be succeeded by Tamamura and Nogawa Ryû producing the famous Dadaist magazine, Ge.Gjmgjgam.Prrr.Gjmgem [GGPG] soon after with the eventual participation of Kitasono Katsue, who was a roommate of the Nogawa brothers at that time. Tamamura Zennosuke, a founding member of the SANKA avant garde art group, is responsible for one of the two main critical articles in this issue of EPOCH and created the illustrations for the covers and internal cuts. As a footnote for any Japanese mystery writing enthusiast, it should be mentioned that Nogawa Takeshi had published material in EPOCH in which he used the nom de plume EDOGAWA RAMPO at least a year before Hirai Tarô did so. In any event, GGPG was self- described as the successor to EPOCH and both journals' contents and creators had an enormous influence on the world of the avant garde in Japan thereafter.

SOLD

 

 

 

 

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3.[BOATS - HANDSCROLL] SEIKO, artist. TWO HANDSCROLLS OF OCEAN AND FRESHWATER BOATS. The box is inscribed by the artist Seiko, zodically dated to 1933 while the scrolls themselves are dated 1931. The ocean scroll is about 458 cm long, the lake and river scroll is about 272 cm long, and both are about 29.2 cm high. The scroll box is inscribed in ink with the Japanese character for "boat". Though we have found a few other paintings online with his signature and seal, Seiko remains a mysterious figure but one obviously adept at the 20th century "Nihonga" style. These delightful scrolls are roughly chronological, taking one from the dawn of history with people using baskets and turtle shells, all the way up to circa 1930 ocean liners. One scroll is dedicated to ocean vessels, the other to boats from rivers, ponds and lakes. A rather deluxe production on excellent paper, with lovely scroll handles and brocade covers. Perhaps a commission from a wealthy patron. With the slightest spalting of the gofun powder defining some waves. Else very fine throughout. A lovely example of the genre.

SOLD

 

 

 

 

 

 

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4.[DESIGN]. Yamanaka Kichirôbei. MOYÔ HINAGATA NANIWA NO UME 2 vols. Ôsaka & Tôkyô, Meiji 19 [1886]. 25.2 x 18.5 cm., string- bound Japanese-style, fukuro-toji. As Dr. Scott Johnson explained in his extensive work on the world of Kyôto design books, Yamanaka Kichirôbei might be described as the pioneer of the late 19th century rebirth of design book puiblication. In this and his MIYAKO NO NISHIKI, also published in 1886, Yamanaka reprinted a kimono design pattern book from the 18th century, with the addition of new color blocks to enhance the effect. He was anticipating an interest in Design for textiles which would soon emerge full blown with the printing firms of firstly Tanaka Jihei and soon thereafter the independent design printshops run by the brothers behind Unsôdô and Unkindô, that would revolutionize the field. This copy of the set is in good condition internally, with excellent color and impressions on the newly carved color blocks. The covers have intact title labels. All enclosed in a custom clasped chitsu case. By no means common. It appears there are a very few odd volumes in institutions, but the only complete set I have heard mention of was the one seen by Dr. Johnson. This set consists of the Jô and Ge volumes, the first volume with a color printed title page on the mikaeshi, then 3 pages of introductory text, two pages of women and children and 60 pages of kimono design. Volume three consists of 58 pages of kimono design and a colophon page. It does not have the obi designs Dr. Johnson describes. Other copies I have tracked down also seem to have varying pagination and content. Since 18th century vintage blocks appear to have been used as the keyblocks, it is possible there was a lot of mixing and matching - two titles and many differences within. As described (and quite possibly, as published).

 

 $2,750.00

 

 

 

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5.[EHON] Nishikawa SUKENOBU. Shinpan ?ji ISE MONOGATARI 2 vols. 26.7 x 18.5 cm. Large Ôhon. It would be hard to do justice to the bibliographical complexity surrounding this very famous book. Kansai University in Ôsaka mounted an online exhibition dedicated to the illustrations of the ISE MONOGATARI. They chose as the two most representative and canonical suites of illustrations those from the SAGA-BON edition done in the very early 17th century and the ones from this book, illustrated by the important Ukiyoe artist Nishikawa Sukenobu and originally published in Enkyô 4 [1747]. Further investigation reveals several interesting facts: First, it would appear that the only copy of the 1747 edition appears to be the one shown by Kansai University, which they say is a printing done later that year under the imprint of booksellers in Edo, Ôsaka and Kyôto. The three others we have located (at the National Research Institute for Japanese Literature), and ours, are from an identically printed edition with a changed colophon, which moves the place of publication to Minoya Heibei on Teramachi in Kyôto from Yoshinoya Fujibei and the colophon date to Hôreki 6 [1756]. The printing quality is for the most part indistinguishable from the earlier Kansai University owned printing. There is one more, if tangential, complication..... Waseda University also has an edition of the ISE MONOGATARI, also dated 1756, also said to be illustrated by Sukenobu on the colophon, but with different printer/publishers and the book and its illustrations are totally different! The illustrations appear quite pedestrian, nowhere near the quality of the Kansai University copy or ours. Could this other edition be some sort of pirated edition with faux Sukenobu prints (he had died a few years earlier, in 1750)? In any event, ours is a lovely large format Sukenobu in a good printing. The covers are worn, but original, as are the printed title labels. In a fitted custom clasped chitsu case. Complete:

 $4,500.00

 

 

  

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6.[EMAKI PAINTED HANDSCROLL] Sei Shonagon. MAKURA ZÔSHI. Very long (approximately 33 feet long and 10 3/4 inches tall) black and white painted and calligraphed illustrated version of this classic Heian era literary work, the PILLOW BOOK. The original work was finished about 1002 after the author had spent years as a lady-in-waiting at the court. The images in this scroll are said to have been first created by an anonymous female artist to go along with the calligraphy of a Buddhist monk named Gokôken-in in the 13th century. The original still exists as an Important Cultural Treasure in Japan. The scroll has been closely copied many times through history. I recently saw a version done in the late 16th century. Ours is a magnificent effort created in the 20th century by Izeri Sosui, born in Kumamoto in 1882. Sosui was known for his efforts in the Yamato-e genre, so this recreation of the classic scroll is a product of long study of the techniques employed. There is a bit of abrasion to the brocade wraparound, else in lovely condition in a wooden box.

  $7,500.00

 

  

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7.[JAPANESE PAPERMAKING]. Edited and compiled by the Editorial Committee for the Tesukiwashi Taikan; editorial staff: Bunsho Jugaku [and others], with the cooperation of the Printing Bureau, Ministry of Finance, the Paper Museum, the National Papermaking Technology Association, and the National Federation of "Tesukiwashi" Makers' Associations. TESUKI WASHI TAIKAN. Tokyo: Mainichi Shinbunsha [Mainichi Newspapers], 1974.

5 huge chitsu cases (each box is approximately 21 x 16 x 6 inches and weighs around 30 lbs.) containing a total of 1001 mounted paper samples:1000 numbered samples, plus 1 unnumbered sample of Uzokogami (Vol. 1, prtfolio 5). Samples are mounted on and enclosed in kozo paper wrappers, either individually or in groups of 2-4, with explanatory letterpress. The paper samples are fine but for the usual and expected offsetting from samples that contain untreated organic materials, such as buckwheat, bark, etc., and a couple of samples that were treated with oil to boost their waterproofing qualities. The wrapper sheets are grouped and housed in colored paper portfolios within the chitsu cases. 7 text volumes (bilingual: Japanese and English, 14 6/16 X 7 5/16 inches, various pp.), some illustrated, some with samples. Limited to 1000 copies, this set is unnumbered.

Each of the boxes has a text volume comprised of a table of contents, essays that relate to the type of papers included in the portfolios in that particular box, and a list of the papers portfolios in that particular box, and a list of the papers included in the portfolios, along with the names of their makers: v. 1. Kizukigami. v. 2. Sukimoyogami. v. 3. Wazomegami. v. 4. Kako washi. v. 5. Chiyogami. Katazomegami. The first box contains another volume of equal size; it is a "Chronology and Glossary" of papermaking, again in both languages, but with a Japanese-language (only) index to the complete set at the end of the Japanese text. The second box also has another dual language volume, it is a slim photo-essay, "How Japanese Make Paper By Hand," that is of equal size to the text volumes. All text volumes, except "How Japanese make paper by hand," are printed on double leaves of kozo paper, Japanese style, and sewn in paper wrappers, Japanese style.

A complete set, housed in the original, green cloth-covered clamshell boxes. All have some external spotting but are internally fine. Each clamshell box is housed in the publisher's protective cardboard carton with labels.

To quote from Soren Edgren's description of this work, from a catalogue published in 1978, "The beauty and value of this collection defy description. The numbered samples with their detailed bilingual data constitute a Papermaking Museum. Another undertaking approaching this magnitude is inconceivable today." It is the ultimate work on the subject.

In excellent complete condition overall.

SOLD

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

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8.[KABUKI] OKANO Seki, editor. KABUKI SHIMPÔ Long run of the Magazine. Published from 1879 until its demise in 1897, the KABUKI NEWS was the primary organ of traditional Kabuki theatre in Japan. At various stages published by the so-called Kabuki Shimpô Publishing Company and later by Kitahara Suehara (Genrokukan) in Tôkyô, nearly 1700 numbers of the journal were produced, with news of performances, b+w woodcut illustrations and in some later issues full-color woodblock covers or frontispieces designed by the ukiyo-e masters of the day. A remarkable resource for students of the history of Kabuki in the Meiji era. The issues were bound in wrappers. We have 538 issues in hand in very clean condition. Some seem to have been removed from multivolume bindings but are complete. So, almost one third of the total published. A useful and important find.

$3,600.00

  

 

 

 

 

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9.[MAVO] TOLLER, Ernst. TSUBAME NO SHO. Tokyo: Chôryûsha Shoten, 1925. Translated by Murayama Tomoyoshi. Illustrated by Okada Tatsuo. 8vo., printed decorated wrappers. Contains 15 full-page original linocuts by Okada, one of a very few works with his MAVO- style original prints. Externally and internally a bit soiled, browned and foxed. Referenced in virtually every work and bibliography on the subject of Taishô-era avant-garde art, this is perhaps THE MOST IMPORTANT COPY OF THIS BOOK IN EXISTENCE. It is the translator, Murayama Tomoyoshi's personal copy, with his stamp from when he lived in Kashiwagi, Shinjuku in Tôkyô. It has extensive handwritten notes and corrections to the translation interpolated into the text. It would appear that they were done at two different times, perhaps one before and one after the war. Included is a copy of the Murayama and Shimatani Itsuo revised translation, published in 1971. Murayama would die in 1977.

Price upon request.

 
 

 

 

 

 

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10.[Papermaking, Korean] Gotô Seikichirô. KANKOKU NO KAMI. Tokyo, Gohachi, Shôwa 55 [1980]. Orihon folding album (24 x 18.3 cm) in block-printed paper covers. Number 12 of a limited edition of 150 copies and is signed and sealed by Gotô, certainly the most important historian of East Asian papermaking in the post-war era. It is one of the few works ever done on Korean papermaking, and is the third in a three part series on Asian papermaking undertaken by Gotô in the late 1970s, though it is complete in itself. The book contains one paper sample, 21 stencilled plates, and informative text (in Japanese) all on lovely rough brown handmade paper. It is as new in a printed white paper covered folding case.

$550.00

 
 
 
 

 

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11. [PHOTOGRAPHY - AVANT GARDE] KOISHI Kiyoshi. SATSUEI - SAKUGA NO SHINGIHO. Tokyo: Genkôsha, Shôwa 11 [1936]. Small square 8vo., cloth-bound, no jacket as issued, in a printed cardboard slipcase. Koishi was one of the most important photographers of Japan in the prewar period. His breakthrough photo book, EARLY SUMMER NERVES, is considered one of the finest works of avant-garde photography ever produced. Here Genkôsha has commissioned him to create a guide for creating photos with his new and experimental techniques of framing and development. Its 294 + pages are shot through from beginning to end with b+w reproductions of his experimental photography. Overall very good condition. Very unusual.

$2,150.00

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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12.[PHOTOGRAPHY] Imada KINGO, editor. HANZAI KAGAKU Vol.3 #7 1932 JUNE. Published in Tôkyô by Bukyôsha. 8vo. size, printed wrappers. This magazine was only published for a short time, though it managed to include stories by important literary figures, wonderful photomontage and avant garde photo foldouts, strange erotica, tales of urban life, reports on "sexual life among the proletariat", etc., etc. Under the broad rubric of "ero-guro nonsensu", the literary and artistic scenes of pre-War Japan, as embodied here in CRIMINOLOGY MAGAZINE, explored the margins. This is the seventh number of the third year of its publication. As might be expected, the editor, Imada Kingo, was a multitalented writer and artist both, who became best known for his children's stories. With wear at the tail of the spine, else very good. Especially noteworthy are the photos reproduced, done by Horino Masao, the important avant- garde photographer. Interesting and very unusual publication.

$325.00

  

 

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13.[PREWAR ADVERTISING]. 2 1/2 SCRAPBOOKS OF JAPANESE ADVERTISING MOCK-UPS. A wonderful collection - over 210 pages of advertising mockups from a Japanese advertising firm, perhaps, of the late 20s and early 30s of the last century. The accounts are mostly identifiend. The mockups are made up of proof-printed texts and illustrations, hand-drawn text and illustrations, original photo positives, etc., etc. Many Deco inspired design elements. Ad interesting view over the shoulder of an advertising designer of the time. Two bound scrapbooks and one unbound selection of loose pages. A lot of the ads appear to be from 1933 [Hachinen], flogging camera film. No indication of the name of the agency or designer, but many of the ads appeared in magazines like ASAHI CAMERA and the like. Very interesting resource.

$950.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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14.SERIZAWA KEISUKE. MASHIKO HIGAERI. This work was originally privately printed by Serizawa in 1943 in katazome stencil printing, bound fukuro-toji, string-bound Japanese-style. 23 full page colored stencil plates. The first 25 copies of A DAY TRIP TO MASHIKO were in full size, as here, 30.2 x 21.5 cm. Another 25 copies were printed on half-sized sheets and present a different impression. Then this printing in 15 large paper copies only was done by Serizawa the following year, all printed and signed by him and enclosed in elegant wooden boxes, also signed and titled by him. With the original printed fukuro dustwrapper. Obviously one of the rarest of all works by Serizawa, this copy being distinguished by its completeness and overall condition. It should also be mentioned that Serizawa's home and Tôkyô workshop there were utterly destroyed during the firebombings of 1945. It was just before and during the war that Serizawa refined his skills at stencil-printing, which would be recognized after the war when he was named a LIVING NATIONAL TREASURE. It was also the time that Serizawa cemented his relationship with the great founder of the Craft Movement in Japan, Yanagi Sôetsu, and became Mingei's most famous artistic practitioner.

SOLD

 

  

 

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15.[Sketch Tour Book] Starr, Frederick. SANYÔ ANGYA. TÔKAIDÔ ANGYA. Tokyo: Bunen'dô, Taishô 8 [1919] 6th printing (the first printing appeared in 1917). Small 8vo., 18 x 10.5 cm, woodblock printed paper over flexible boards. Includes 27 b+w full page woodcuts, many textual ills, 7 photo plates and a total of 11 full page color woodblock plates by Akamatsu Rinsaku, Noda Kyûhô, Hata Tsuneharu, Mizushima Nihofu and Nagai Hyôsai. Those 5 artists had earlier in 1917 collaborated on Bunen'dô's ambitious HANSHIN MEISHÔ ZUE. Nakazawa Hiromitsu and others were also involved with Starr's work, which is a compilation of travel articles on Central Japan originally done for the Osaka Asahi newspaper. [For more information, refer to Scott Johnson's article in ANDON 37, p. 30]

This copy is very good in a rubbed original slipcase, which is illustrated with color woodcut. Unusual in any event, particularly so in such nice condition.

$475.00

 

 

 

 

 

 

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16.[SÔSAKU HANGA] OKAMURA Kichiemon, artist. MANYÔ SHIKI HANA ZUKUSHI. 32.3 x 20.3 cm Privately printed in the fall of Shôwa 19 [1944] by the artist using kappazuri stencil printing. String-bound Japanese-style, fukuro-toji. Printed paper title label. About fine condition. #42 of 100 copies.

$475.00