TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes. author Yoshida Kenkō 吉田兼好, Yoshida Hanbei 吉田半兵.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.
TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.

TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes.

1672. Item #90766

Yoshida Kenkō 吉田兼好, author and Yoshida Hanbei 吉田半兵, illustrator (?). TSUREZUREGUSA 徒然草 2 volumes. Kyōto, Kanbun 12 [1672]. The afterward of this work briefly describes the motivation for its production.... that is, prior versions of the text are said to have numerous errors and this recut and edited version is meant to correct them. It would appear that this textual and illustrated version was largely reproduced in 1694..... There has, of course, been a large amount of scholarly work, beginning in the 17th century, done on Kenkō's work and many others in the "canon" of traditionally accepted literary masterpieces.

Originally composed in the early 1330s by the Kyōto monk Kenkō, these "Random Jottings" are a vade mecum to the medieval world of Kyōto. By the end of that decade, the Military Government in Kamakura had fallen and the Ashikaga had risen to power. That break caused a huge amount of violence and destruction and a split in the Imperial line which divided into Northern and Southern Courts. The former, in Kyoto, eventually won after 50 years because of its backing from the Ashikaga. Ironically, the Southern Court in Yoshino, which lost, has since been declared (in 1911) the legitimate line, despite the fact that the current Emperors are descended from the Northern line!

So, at the end of the 16th, beginning of the 17th century, the unification decades, that ended with the Tokugawa Regime establishing control, led to an examination of the "Classics" of Japanese literature, in light of Japan's growing cultural independence from China, especially after the war over Korea..... Interestingly, as all canon creation inevitably does, it reflected the competing schools of Neo-Confucianism (Hayashi Razan helped to create Kenkōs reputation), Buddhist and Shintō worldviews, expressed in the new exegesis applied to the classics. For more, see Linda H. Chance "CONSTRUCTING THE CLASSICS: TSUREZUREGUSA IN TOKUGAWA READINGS."

As for the illustrations, they resemble closely the work done by Yoshida Hanbei, the primary illustrator of the Kansai region, the counterpart to Hishikawa Moronobu in Edo.

This is among the most perfectly preserved early Edo era works we have ever handled. Original covers in blue, original clean title labels, good impressions throughout, wonderful woodblock prints, very good or better condition... Enclosed in a clasped chitsu case. A remarkable copy of an impossibly scarce book.

Price: $6,500.00